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Crysis 2 Dropped From Steam

Although Crysis 2 has been populating store shelves for a couple of months now, you will not be able to find it on Steam. “Why” you ask? Well, up until recently, no one knew. Now we have answers.

Recently, an EA spokesperson explained the situation to Giant Bomb’s Patrick Klepek. It seems that Crytek, Crysis 2‘s developer, had made a deal with another digital distributor for the rights to the DLC. And, because Steam couldn’t distribute the downloadable content, they took down the core game as well.

According to a statement released by EA, they “had nothing to do with Steam’s decision to drop Crysis 2.”

So far, there has been no word as to whether or not Crysis 2 will return to Steam. I think the bigger question is this: will situations such as this arise with future EA — or any publisher’s — titles?

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  • Anonymous

    Crysis 2 is probably selling as poorly as the first. Hopefully they got a bundle of money for the DLC rights.

  • Anonymous

    Crysis 2 is probably selling as poorly as the first. Hopefully they got a bundle of money for the DLC rights.

  • Anonymous

    Crysis 2 is probably selling as poorly as the first. Hopefully they got a bundle of money for the DLC rights.

  • Dan Fazekas

    Somewhere in the rumor mill I heard that EA was going to attempt their own “Steam” online service. Would make sense to take one of the big titles and move contract rights to someone else – most likely who ever is actually going to subsidize EA’s web product. May or may not be the smartest move on Steam’s part to remove, but with so many offerings and a strong base, it most likely isn’t going to be a big loss.

    • Anonymous

      EA has had a competitor to Steam for a long time. Their digital distribution platform, the EA Downloader and EA Store were for a long time the main way to get EA’s games directly through downloads. However it was a pretty terrible system, there was hardly any community for it, the program (EA Downloader) was no where as feature heavy as Steam and was in reality no more than a download manager (which most hardcore PC gamers hate). Its biggest flaw was that unlike Steam, your games were not saved forever. After 6 months you no longer had download rights to your games, you could still play them if you had the install files, but if you lost the game because of a harddrive crash or reformat, or uninstalled it and forgot about the game, you had to pay to get it again. This was seen as a very transparent money grab and alienated many users away from it.

      However recently EA has completely rebranded their store, it is now called Origin and is much closer to a steam competitor. The application actually allows you to view the store and make purchases through it instead of just linking to an external website. It also has a friends list and a library feature, and this time your games are available permanently. Even better EA allows you to import your serial keys from boxed copies you have (providing your game was released after 2009). 

      I recently tried the Origin platform and while it has a very long way to come it is magnitudes better than the previous system. I was actually very surprised to see the Battlefield 2 Collection I had purchased years ago through the EA Store automatically appear when I logged in for the first time. I was also able to add Mirrors Edge to my collection via my retail cd key.

      EA made a very big move in digital distribution when they announced their partnership with Steam. In a way they were acknowledging the success of Steam and the failure of EA Downloader and it was a great day for gamers because they finally had a reliable and supported method to get EA games digitally. Hopefully EA will not reverse this decision now that they have Origin.  I know that myself and many others will even entertain Steam competitors as it is too much of a hassle to manage multiple accounts and programs so if they start selling exclusively through Origin they have already lost one customer.